One of the biggest criticisms against the MCU has been its lack of consistent or memorable music. This partially stems from some characters' musical motifs changing from movie to movie, such as Ramin Djawadi's score in Iron Man seeing no more use in either sequel. However, Marvel Studios has gotten better about bringing back composers for sequels or at the very least reusing certain tracks from the previous composer.

Even Mark Mothersbaugh, composer for Thor: Ragnarok, knew to bring back Patrick Doyle's work, “Sons of Odin,” for a more emotional impact when Thor finally became King by the end of the movie. It's even easier when Marvel Studios sticks with the same composer, at least for specific franchises like Michael Giacchino for Spider-Man. And now, one composer closely linked to the Captain America franchise will see a return composing for Sam and Bucky.

NEWS

On Sven Faulconer's website showcasing his credits on films, mostly for “additional music” like Black Widow, it also includes The Falcon and the Winter Soldier for “additional music.”

Clicking on the Disney+ show shows a more detailed description of the credit, saying that it is additional music for composer Henry Jackman, indicating that he will be returning to the MCU as the primary composer for The Falcon and the Winter Soldier.

WHAT THIS MEANS

Henry Jackman returning means it is inevitable that fans will hear familiar scores from his previous work in Captain America: The Winter Soldier and Captain America: Civil War. The most obvious tracks likely to see a return are “Into the Fray,” which had motifs in the track that often accompanied Falcon, and the theme for Bucky's brainwashed alias “The Winter Soldier,” which also made a return in Civil War when Bucky was under Zemo's control.

It is unlikely that fans will actually hear the latter, as it seems now that Bucky is cured of HYDRA's brainwashing demonstrated by him threateningly dumping a handful of bullets in front of Zemo in the trailers. What would actually be a pleasant surprise is if Jackman decides to use or sample Christophe Beck's score from Ant-Man, specifically “First Mission,” which had a variation of Falcon's motif.